Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Seoul-Incheon Airport Transit Hotel

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Introduction & Itinerary

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Check-in & Star Alliance First Class Lounge LAX

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: OZ 201 Los Angeles to Seoul-Incheon

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: OZ 723 Seoul-Incheon to Hong Kong

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Check-in & CNAC Lounge Hong Kong

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Singapore Airlines SilverKris Lounge Hong Kong

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: OZ 724 Hong Kong to Seoul-Incheon

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Seoul-Incheon Airport Transit Hotel

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: Asiana Business Class Lounge Seoul-Incheon

Asiana Airlines Trip Report: OZ202 Seoul-Incheon to Los Angeles

My flight from Hong Kong was the first to arrive at Seoul’s Incheon Airport in the morning and being one of the first off the airplane, it seemed a bit surreal to walk through a totally empty airport. I had been awake for hours and was looking forward to getting some solid sleep, so made my way to the nearby transit hotel.

I didn’t make a reservation ahead of time and was simply hoping they’d have a vacancy, which they did. Their website states arrivals after 6:00pm require the purchase of a 12-hour block of time and that’s what I had to pay at 4:30am. It came out to about US$114, so not bad at all.

It was a quick check-in and I made my way to room 118, an inside room without a window (outside rooms are available with windows).

Their website showcases exactly what you get and when I entered my room there were no surprises.

The bed was fantastically comfortable and I was actually thankful for an inside room so I didn’t have to deal with any light pollution once the sun rose. I was very tired by this point and slept a solid five hours.

The only clock in the room was wall-mounted, so it’s pretty imperative to have your mobile phone fully charged to set an alarm, or rely on a wake-up call from the front desk. I set my phone and woke refreshed and ready for a shower

I didn’t pre-plan like I normally do and have water with me, so ended up using one of the in-room waters from the mini-fridge (it was US$2). Other amenities were available for purchase including Gillette Mach 3 razors with shaving cream and a toothbrush kit.

Inside the bathroom, complimentary amenities included a comb, sanitary bag, shower cap, cotton tips and shea body lotion. The shower had a universal shampoo dispenser and one small deodorant soap. There was no facial tissue and the room comes with one large bath towel and two hand towels (no washcloths).

It was perfect for what I needed and I’d highly recommend booking this “hotel” if you have a lengthy layover and don’t have enough time for a tour of Seoul. Had it not been 4:30 in the morning, I’m certain I would have taken one of the many stopover tours available to transit passengers.

After checking out of the transit hotel, I made my way to the Asiana Business Class lounge, the next installment of this trip report. Here’s a quick video of the transit hotel:

Comments

  1. can you please clarify how much for the 12-hr rental at the ICN transit hotel?

    UA$114 isn’t clear since it is either USD, KWon, or AUD. I suspect it is 114 USD.

    thought of that same transit hotel the last 2-3 times blowing thru ICN with 6 hour layovers. (no status through.)

  2. Hi,
    I have 2 questions. I would really appreciate it if you could kindly take the time to answer these.

    1) Is the Transit Hotel inside the airport ? I mean does a passenger has to clear immigration or something to use this hotel.

    2) Singapore Airlines provides for a free stopover tour for passengers traveling through Changi. Is the Seoul stopover tour similar to that. I mean is there any charge for this and how do you get the visa to go on the stopover tour.

    thanks.

    • Hi there,

      1) Yes, it’s inside the secure area, so no need to clear immigration to use.
      2) I believe there is a charge for the stopover tours if your airline doesn’t supply them for free. I didn’t check with Asiana on their offer(s). U.S. passport holders don’t need a visa for South Korea, so no worries there. Check with your country’s rules if you’re not a US-holder.

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